A stronger and more distinct Singaporean-Chinese identity necessary for addressing China’s misperceptions of Singapore

Drawing on her undergraduate research on mainland Chinese students’ perception of the Singaporean-Chinese identity, Shu Min Chong finds that misperceptions result in mainland Chinese having unrealistic expectations of Singaporeans and Singapore. While it is easy to put blame on China, Shu Min argues that Singapore needs to do more to articulate what a unique Singaporean-Chinese identity looks like.

Read more

同为华人?论新加坡人与中国人对“新加坡华人”的认知差异

“中国人和新加坡华人都是华人”,这种看法成立吗?基于她本科论文有关新中两国人民对“新加坡华人”认知差异的研究,张树敏发现当中国人对新加坡华人身份和文化的认知与现实有偏差。她认为新加坡应该加强本土华人身份认同,并对此提出一些政策意见。

Read more

The Loving Critics Have Votes, What They Want Is Voice

While recent events have triggered concerns over democracy and fundamental freedoms in Singapore, Seow Yongzhi argues that these debates conflate the terms “democracy” and “liberalism”. Democracies, as Yongzhi points out, can be highly illiberal. Instead, what Singaporeans want is not necessarily democracy, but liberty – the right to voice their disagreements.

Read more

A Historical Perspective on Singapore-China Relations: 1965-1975

In this research paper, Katherine Enright argues that Singapore-China relations from 1965-1975 can best be understood not merely as a bilateral relationship, but as one situated in a complex web of international political dynamics, both in relation to Cold War powers (the US and the USSR) and Southeast Asia. Singapore’s pragmatic foreign policy outlook – one that prioritised economic security and the balancing of international and regional powers – in turn influenced Singapore’s engagement with China and its reaction to broader Cold War dynamics. Ultimately, the confluence of these factors contributed to a dramatic warming in Singapore-China relations during this period.

Read more

Imagining Utopias: The Importance of Moral Idealism in Singapore

“It is tempting to believe that the cynic is, somehow, more intelligent than the dreamer. But in truth, pragmatism is no smarter than idealism.” Lee Chin Wee argues that, in discussions about Singapore’s future, we should leave room at the table for idealists and dreamers. In his view, it is a mistake to treat the government’s growth-oriented and metrics-focused narrative of pragmatism as gospel truth. When Singaporeans present and grapple with competing visions of the ‘good’, this strengthens social inclusion and improves policy-making.

Read more