Rethinking Scholarship Diversity: The Pre-U Education of PSC Scholars

Minister-in-Charge of the Public Service Chan Chun Sing recently remarked that the diversity of Public Service Commission Scholarship recipients goes beyond race, language, and religion. This raises questions about how diverse recipients have been in socio-economic terms, of which pre-university education provides a good proxy for assessment. In this piece, Andrew Chia looks at why diversity in background matters, and explores the diversity of PSC scholars using compiled data on PSC Scholarships from 2007 to 2018.

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Beyond Plastic Recycling: A look at Extended Producer Responsibility in Singapore

Singapore’s current efforts in managing plastic waste are mostly focused on downstream measures, but the broader issue of plastic consumption continues to require action upstream. Ensuring responsible production processes, through policy regulation, can help to promote general reduction of plastic waste and environmental impact. To that end, Woo Qiyun spotlights the role of an Extended Producer Responsibility scheme in Singapore, to increase the accountability of corporations and government.

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From the Editor’s Desk: Plans For the Year

Welcome back!
As SPJ resumes after our summer hiatus, we find ourselves confronted with a landscape that seems equal parts challenging and exciting. As much as the Covid-19 pandemic has disrupted our lives and exacerbated our existing societal pressures, it also provides an opportunity to take stock of our policies, so that we may improve and innovate. We have seen Singaporeans actively participating in discussions on our future direction, and in that same spirit, the Journal is proud to detail its plans for the year. We invite all our readers to join us in engaging with our Singapore conversation, and to contribute their ideas through articles and discourse. Read the letter for more information on our plans for the year, and how you can get involved!

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The politics of language: How can we mainstream social justice vocabularies?

How might we mainstream social justice ideas and language, beginning a national conversation that extends beyond more recognised civil society actors? Reflecting on the discourse surrounding migrant rights, Quah Say Jye draws upon philosopher Miranda Fricker’s concept of “epistemic injustice” to propose a shared vocabulary that might allow migrant workers into our linguistic community. He suggests that our semantic choices need to accurately represent the lived experiences of migrant workers, be accessible to them and the general public, and have the potential to pivot towards broader structural critiques.

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